Making Code the Universal Language

In 2013, I landed in Shanghai for a few meetings. My first few minutes walking around the city led to a conversation with a stranger I met in a bar after his long day of work. We discussed life in Shanghai, where he lived, how long he’d been in Shanghai, and what he did for a living. He told me he had just landed a new job with a programming consultancy in Shanghai, and said it all started with a website— Codecademy.com — through which he’d learned to code.

This scene repeated itself months later in Dublin, where I was meeting James Whelton of CoderDojo. We talked about programming education and noticed the couple next to us were talking about programming too. It turned out that they were both Dublin-based programmers - he for Facebook and she for a software consultancy. She talked about how she was planning to leave her job writing Apex (for Salesforce) to take a job writing Ruby, which she had just learned on Codecademy.

These stories aren’t unique — in fact, they’re a reality for most Codecademy users, 70% of whom live outside the United States. From the beginning, we’ve watched with amazement as Codecademy spread. The day we launched, we expected traffic to die down overnight in California, but we hadn’t taken into account that people were just signing on in other parts of the world. Since then, we’ve kept our global audience in mind with everything we’ve built, realizing that the power of an education transcends borders beyond the city we build Codecademy in and the language we speak.

Codecademy: Bringing Skills to You, Wherever You Are

Today, we’re bringing easy access to a world-class skills education to even more people across the world — hoping they’ll benefit from Codecademy in the same way that our more than 24 million existing learners have. We’ve worked to translate Codecademy to Spanish, Portuguese, and French, with more languages on the way. But that’s not all — we’re working closely to create communities and become embedded in new countries to help new learners all over the world become empowered with the skills they need to succeed in the 21st century. We’ve got amazing partners to help us bring Codecademy to five new countries (along with those that speak their languages!).

United Kingdom

The UK made news as the first G8 country to mandate programming education for all primary and secondary schoolers. We’ve worked hand-in-hand with many organizations in the UK over the past few years — sponsoring Code Club as they bring programming education to after school groups, working with the Computing At School network to help connect teachers with resources, and with the government itself to bring programming to classrooms — and we’re now doubling down on our commitment to the UK by opening our first international office in London, headed by Rachel Swidenbank.

France

Libraries Without Borders (Bibliothèques sans Frontières) has worked tirelessly over the past few years to expand access to literacy across French-speaking countries, among them Haiti, Cameroon, and others. Today, Codecademy is working with Libraries Without Borders to translate Codecademy into French and to implement pilot programs to reduce unemployment and including programming in schools. In addition, Codecademy will be a component of the recently announced Ideas Box (designed by Philippe Starck), a project that will be deployed in refugee camps and disaster zones across the world to empower individuals with the skills to improve their lives. Grants from the public and private sector in France helped to make all of this possible.

Brazil

The Lemann Foundation is the largest education foundation in Brazil, funding innovation on the K-12 level and elsewhere by fostering innovation inside the country and by bringing international technological developments to students. Codecademy is available in Portuguese today thanks to close work with the Lemann Foundation and will soon launch in several Brazilian pilots. One of our proudest moments was talking to Brazilian teachers a month ago in São Paolo about today’s launch of Codecademy in Portuguese, their native language.

Argentina and Buenos Aires

The Government of Buenos Aires, led by Mauricio Macri, has made an ambitious commitment to bringing skills and programming education to all of their citizens by working together with Codecademy. Jorge Aguado, the head of educational technology for the City, has worked to make sure that Buenos Aires is one of the first cities in South America (and the world!) to make a statement about its digital future, tying programming into every school in Buenos Aires, pursuing a campaign to provide skills to the unemployed, and to train government workers with technology. Both we and the government of Buenos Aires think this is the first commitment of its kind in the South American region and think it’s a terrific template for other cities (and governments) moving forward. Buenos Aires’ commitment is particularly notable given that its Spanish translations will be available to the entirety of the Spanish speaking world.

Estonia

Estonia’s Tiger Leap program has helped it become one of the most advanced digital economies in the world. We hope to support this commitment by working with the Estonian government to help every Estonian K-12 student learn to program.

Codecademy Speaks Spanish, Portuguese, French, and more!

It’s often said that code is the “language of the 21st century.” We at Codecademy think that code is a language that’s cross-border and truly international, and that our new work internationally is an essential step towards bringing advanced digital skills to people all over the world. We can’t wait to hear stories from the millions of new Codecademy learners to come and from the additional partners we’ll be announcing soon!


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