What did you study in college?

After barely passing the Computer Science major requirements at UC Berkeley, I decided to focus on easier topics to graduate with: English and Social Welfare.

How did you get into tech?

When I graduated I had years of building websites under my belt, so my first job was at a venture-backed startup. I quickly learned how lonely it can be as a woman on an all-male engineering teams, so I went on to start Women 2.0 to meet like-minded entrepreneurial women in tech, and then two years later started Bay Area Girl Geek Dinners to meet even MORE of them! Women in tech DO exist in droves!

Angie

What are you currently working on?

Currently I'm working to change the ratio of women in engineering as Director of Growth at Hackbright Academy. An accelerated software development program solely for women, we attract students from all over the world and pair them with software engineer mentors to help them find work in tech. Now our students are working at partner companies and commanding some pretty impressive salaries after graduating from the 10-week program.

When did you get into programming?

In high school we got AOL at home and I was fascinated by the Internet. I looked at the HTML behind the simple webpages in 1999, and learned to write my own code and put up webpages. As a shy and quiet student, I supported my friends in leadership positions by creating their websites, and they started referring me to paid positions. And so it goes.

How did you learn to program?

Learning to program is simply being curious about how things work. How does this webpage render? What makes that do that? You peek behind the curtain, like they did in Wizard of Oz, and find that it's lines of code that eventually make sense after you do a lot of Googling and asking questions.

mentoring

Google is a great resource for learning to program, as well as simply hanging out with other people who like to code. When sitting next to another person on their laptop coding (I think we call this "co-working" now), you can ask questions aloud and have them answered right away.

Your 140 character tip for aspiring founders?

Just start asking questions out loud - over Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn - and you will learn from the answers you receive. Start iterating on your idea, and it will snowball.

The official blog of Codecademy

The easiest way to learn to code

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