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Web Development Change Log

Take a look at the at the recent changes to the Web Development domain content

January 12th, 2022 - Updates to Our Learn JavaScript: Request’s Wanderlust Project

Great news! We are updating our Wanderlust project, found in our JavaScript course: Requests. This course can also be found through our Create a Front-End App with React Skill Path, and through our Full-Stack, Front-End, and Back-End Career Paths. This update is in response to the newly updated Foursquare API that is used in the project.

Why?

With Foursquare’s updated API, the way we need to interact with the API has also changed. This means we need to update the project narrative, some of the project steps, and also some of the provided starter code.

When?

These changes will go live on January 12th, 2022

How does this impact you?

  • If you’ve previously completed the Wanderlust project, you’ll keep your progress. However, your existing code will be replaced with our new starter code. You can opt to re-do the project if you want to — the project steps will already be updated for you. If you want to save your code, make sure to do it before January 12th, 2022!

  • If you’re currently working through Wanderlust, your code will be replaced by the new starter code. The steps will be updated on January 12th for you to work alongside the new instructions.

  • If you haven’t started on Wanderlust then you’re in luck! You can start anew on this project that practices making API requests from a clean slate.

What are the specific changes?

  • The narrative that explains the project will have updated links to the Foursquare API.
  • The project steps that reference how to interact with the previous version of the Foursquare API will have its text and hints updated.
  • Starter code that previously supported requests to the previous Foursquare’s API now accurately reflects the new API’s structure.

Where?

Applicable changes will appear in the following course:

Skill path:

Career paths:

TL;DR

Wanderlust is being updated since it uses the Foursquare API, which has also gotten an update.


November 17 - Updates to Our Intermediate JavaScript Content

Good news, everyone! We are updating Learn Intermediate JavaScript for our JavaScript learners.

This update will add further intermediate JavaScript content to the existing intermediate JavaScript course.

Why?

We’ve heard you, loud and clear: you want more depth of content! Our new content provides a deeper understanding of how JavaScript operates under the hood, as well as best practices for JavaScript programming.

When?

These changes will go live on November 17th, 2021.

How does this impact you?

  • If you’re currently enrolled in Learn Intermediate JavaScript, your progress is likely to DECREASE.
  • If you’ve completed the Learn Intermediate JavaScript course, your progress will DECREASE.

What are the specific changes?

  • New article on how Memory Management works in JavaScript.
  • Explore how to debug for memory leaks.
  • New article on Design Patterns in JavaScript.

Where?

Applicable changes will appear in the following course: Learn Intermediate JavaScript

TL;DR

Learn Intermediate JavaScript is getting more advanced content.


September 13th - Introducing the Learn Build Tools Course and Updates to Our JavaScript Content

Great news! We are introducing the Learn Build Tools course and making changes to our Learn JavaScript content.

This update will move the Learn JavaScript’s Browser Compatibility and Transpilation module to the new Learn Build Tools course. The module’s lesson, project, and quiz will also be updated to focus on addressing browser compatibility issues using Babel.

Why?

As we continue to revise our JavaScript content, we’ve recognized that the Browser Compatibility and Transpilation module fits better in the newly launched Learn Build Tools course.

This update will also ensure that Learn Javascript is beginner-friendly.

When?

These changes will go live on September 13th, 2021

How does this impact you?

If you’ve previously completed Learn JavaScript, you’ll keep your certificates and progress.

If you’re currently enrolled in Learn JavaScript, your progress will likely INCREASE as the Browser Compatibility and Transpilation module will be removed.

What are the specific changes?

  • Learn JavaScript’s Browser Compatibility and Transpilation module will be moved to the new Learn Build Tools course.
  • The lesson, project, and quiz in the Browser Compatibility and Transpilation module will be updated.

Where?

Applicable changes will appear in the following courses:

TL;DR

Learn JavaScript’s Browser Compatibility and Transpilation module will be moved to the new Learn Build Tools course.


August 30, 2021 - Updates to Our JavaScript Content

Great news! We are introducing Learn Intermediate JavaScript as a course for our JavaScript learners.

This update will break up our Learn JavaScript into a shorter, complete beginner course, while moving some of our more advanced concepts, and some brand new content, to the Intermediate course.

Why?

As we continue to add more JavaScript content to our catalog, we want to differentiate between beginner and more advanced content while also breaking up the JavaScript content into digestible chunks.

When?

These changes will go live on August 30th, 2021.

How does this impact you?

If you’ve previously completed Learn JavaScript, you’ll keep your certificates and progress.

If you’re currently enrolled in Learn JavaScript, your progress will likely INCREASE.

If you’ve completed some of the more advanced Learn JavaScript content, you will additionally now show progress on the new Learn Intermediate JavaScript course.

What are the specific changes?

  • The back of Learn JavaScript will be broken off and titled Learn Intermediate JavaScript.
  • Additional content items on currying, hoisting, concurrency model, and event loops will be added to this new Learn Intermediate JavaScript course.
  • Additional contextual informationals will be added to Learn JavaScript.

Where?

Applicable changes will appear in the following courses:

TL;DR

Learn JavaScript is being broken into two courses — Learn JavaScript and Learn Intermediate JavaScript — and there will be additional new content in Learn Intermediate JavaScript.


July 1, 2021 - Updates to Our Learn Node.js Content

Good news! We’re improving our Learn Node.js content with more modules to help learners Updates to the existing Learn Node.js course expand the one-module course into a four-module course. More core Node.js modules are introduced and one module is dedicated to introducing learners to HTTP and creating servers using the built-in HTTP module.

Why?

Oftentimes, Node.js courses are bundled with external packages such as Express. Our updated Learn Node.js will focus on the core Node.js packages that are built into the framework, making sure that learners gain a strong fundamental knowledge in Node.js before moving on to learning about other popular packages such as Express and SQLite.

When?

These changes will go live on July 1st, 2021.

How does this impact you?

If you’ve previously completed Learn Node.js or any of the affected paths, you’ll keep your certificates and progress.

If you’re currently enrolled in Learn Node.js, chances are you’ll see your progress decrease, as we’ve added more to the course.

What are the specific changes?

  • Learn Node.js lesson is being updated and divided into two lessons: Introduction to Node.js and Node.js Essentials.
  • New lesson on Setting up a Server with HTTP
  • Updated and new quizzes on core Node.js modules and HTTP
  • New projects: Message Mixer and Rock-Paper-Scissors
  • New articles on JavaScript for Node.js, Node Package Manager
  • Added articles on What is JSON, Implementing Modules in Node, Node modules, and What is REST?
  • Updated the Setting up Node.js Locally article

Where?

Applicable changes will appear in the following Paths and courses:

Learn Node.js

TL;DR

Learn Node.js is expanding to a 4-module course that will give learners in-depth preparedness for back-end development with popular packages.


April 15th, 2021 - Updates to Our Learn CSS Content

Get excited! We’re improving our Learn CSS content with bug fixes, 3 completely new modules, and a division into two parts: Learn CSS and Learn Intermediate CSS.

Why?

At first, we just wanted to create some more intermediate CSS content to help you up your skills. Then we realized we had an opportunity to reorganize Learn CSS for the better. Instead of turning Learn CSS into a giant, 13 module course, we wanted to help you find the content you needed by separating the intro material, like syntax, from the more advanced stuff, like transitions. So now we have a whole bunch of new content and a better way of finding it!

On top of this, we made a giant list of all of the feedback you’ve provided us and bugs you’ve reported, and we fixed as many as we possibly could.

When?

These changes will go live on April 15th, 2021.

How does this impact you?

If you’ve previously completed Learn CSS or any of the affected paths, you’ll keep your certificates and progress.

If you’re currently enrolled in Learn CSS, chances are you’ll see your progress increase, and you might also already have some progress in Learn Intermediate CSS! This is because we’re moving some content from Learn CSS to Learn Intermediate CSS. However, because we’re also dividing the very first lesson of Learn CSS into two halves, you won’t see the new, second half of that first lesson marked as complete. In order to obtain 100% progress in Learn CSS, you’ll have to complete the new lesson, CSS Selectors.

Lastly, if you’ve previously reported a bug in our Learn CSS course, chances are we’ve fixed it!

What are the specific changes?

  • We’ve split Learn CSS into two courses: Learn CSS and Learn Intermediate CSS.
  • Three completely new modules for Learn Intermediate CSS: Variables and Functions, Browser Compatibility, and Accessibility
  • We’ve moved 3 modules from Learn CSS to the new intermediate course: Layout with Flexbox, Grid, CSS - Transitions,
  • We’ve also moved the Responsive Design module from Learn Responsive Design to the new Intermediate course
  • An overhaul of the first lesson in Learn CSS. We’ve split it into two more cohesive lessons, CSS Setup and Syntax and CSS Selectors, and we’ve added 4 new exercises to boot!
  • We’ve deprecated the CSS Grid: Architecture Blog project. Instead, we’ve given the CSS Grid: PupSpa project an overhaul.
  • Bug fixes all throughout our existing CSS content

Where?

Applicable changes will appear in the following Paths and courses:

TLDR

We’re dividing Learn CSS into two courses and adding some more advanced content. Any progress and certificates you have will be retained.


March 18, 2021 - Updates to our JavaScript Modules Content

Good news! We’re updating our JavaScript curriculum with new content on ES6 and Node modules.

Why?

We’re constantly looking for ways to improve our curriculum and the Modules content within our JavaScript curriculum has been in need of a refresh!

In particular, we wanted to highlight the different syntaxes used in implementing modules in front-end applications and back-end applications. To help with this, we’ve added an article on JavaScript Runtime Environments, which is essential to understanding the differences between front-end and back-end web development. We also wanted to revamp the projects to more accurately reflect how modules may be used in front-end and back-end applications.

Applicable changes will appear in the following Paths and courses:

When?

These changes will go live on March 26th, 2021.

How does this impact you?

If you’ve previously started or completed the Modules content in the Learn JavaScript course or any of the relevant Paths, you’ll notice that the Intermediate JavaScript Modules lesson has been replaced with two interactive articles and the projects have been rewritten to be more engaging and instructive.

If you’ve previously completed the course and/or one of the Paths, you’ll keep your certificates and progress.

Even if you’ve completed these older content items, we highly encourage you to take the new and improved versions.

What are the specific changes?

  • A new article on Runtime Environments
  • The Intermediate JavaScript Modules lesson has been condensed into two interactive articles. One article focuses on ES6 syntax for implementing modules in front-end applications. The second article focuses on Node syntax for implementing modules in back-end applications.
  • Revamped projects that highlight and illustrate the differences in implementing modules in a front-end application vs. a back-end application
  • A revised quiz to align with the new articles

Recap

We’re updating our JavaScript modules content on March 26th, 2021 to be more engaging and to provide a better learning experience. Any progress and certificates you have will be retained.


March 12, 2021 - Full-Stack, Front-End, and Back-End Updates

After a successful launch of the same feature in Full-Stack (see February 12, 2021 for more details), we added Career Path groups to the Front-End and Back-End Engineer Career Paths.

Based on your feedback, we also added some new instructional content, re-ordered some of the units to avoid testing a concept that we haven’t yet taught, and replaced our old Redux articles with lessons, quizzes, projects, and videos from the recently released Learn Redux course.

Career Path Groups

  • Pair Programming, Code Review, and Group Project Informationals are added throughout Front-End and Back-End
  • Updated the opening unit of the Front-End and Back-End Career Paths to include ‘Community Resources’ and clarified information in the other Informationals

New Content

Not all of these additions apply to all paths. The applicable paths are marked in [square brackets], where Full-Stack is FS, Front-End is FE, and Back-End is BE.

  • Improved Redux content: Replaced a majority of the Redux unit with our newly produced Learn Redux content. Most of the external articles we used are replaced by interactive lessons, projects, quizzes, and videos [FS, FE]
  • New Challenge Projects: Added the React ‘Appointment Planner’ Challenge Project and the Redux ‘Flashcards’ Challenge Project [FS, FE]. In FS, the ‘Appointment Planner’ Challenge Project is now the recommended project for the Code Review in ‘React, Part II’. Previously, the recommended project was the ‘Copycat’ project.
  • Additional Articles: Added ‘Intro to Mozilla Developer Network’, ‘The for…of Loop’, ‘What is Markdown?’ articles, [FS, FE, BE] and assorted deployment articles on Netlify and Heroku [‘Deploy a React Application with Netlify’ in FE and FS, ‘Deploying Back-Ends with Heroku’ in BE]
  • New introductory interview unit: Added ‘What to Expect in a Technical Interview’ before the data structures units [FS, FE, BE]
  • Resolved broken dependencies: Moved ‘Learn CSS: Documentation and Debugging’ after Flexbox [FS, FE]; Added ‘Learn HTML: Tables’ before ‘Build Your Own Cheat Sheet’ Challenge Project [FS, FE]; Moved ‘Running JavaScript’ after learners have covered basic JavaScript [FS, FE, BE]; Moved ‘Setting Up Your Dev Environment’ after learners have covered basic JavaScript [FS]

FAQ

I’m already enrolled in the Front-End or Back-End Engineer Path, do I have a group?
Everyone who is currently enrolled in either Path has automatically been placed in a group-based on your enrollment date. All you need to do is click the link in the informationals to be connected with your group in the forums!

Do I have to do these activities with my group?
While you’ll first join your group on the forums, you’re welcome to use any of our other community spaces (Discord, Codecademy Chapters, Facebook) to connect with other Codecademy learners and do group programming activities.

Do I need to do these activities?
These activities are fully optional and you do not need to complete them in order to complete the path. However, we highly encourage everyone to try at least one of the activities! You’re also welcome to do these activities as often as you like—no need to wait for our suggestions.