Drag the edges to resize the window.

In Projects, you can keep track of your progress as you go throught the tasks. Check each item as you complete it!

Code Editor
Learn
Control Flow

Ternary Operator

In the previous exercise, we learned shorthand for writing multiple if/else if/else statements to make them easier to read. JavaScript also provides a way to shorten simple if/else statements called the ternary operator.

let isNightTime = true; if (isNightTime) { console.log('Turn on the lights!'); } else { console.log('Turn off the lights!'); }

In the example above, we see a very familiar pattern. See the example below for an equivalent way to express this.

isNightTime ? console.log('Turn on the lights!') : console.log('Turn off the lights!');

The code in the example above will operate exactly as the code from the previous example. Let's break this example into its parts:

  1. isNightTime ? — the conditional statement followed by a question mark. This checks if isNightTime is truthy.
  2. console.log ('Turn on the lights!') — this code will be executed if the condition is truthy.
  3. : — a colon separates the two different blocks of code that can be executed.
  4. console.log('Turn off the lights!'); — this code will be executed if the condition is falsy

In this example, we checked if the value of a variable was true or false. The ternary operator can be used for any condition that can be evaluated to true or false, such as those with comparison operators.

age >= 16 ? console.log('You are old enough to drive in the United States!') : console.log('You are not old enough to drive in the United States!');

In the example above, the conditional statement is checking whether the value of the variable age is greater than or equal to 16. If so, a message that states the user is old enough to drive will be logged to the console. Otherwise, a message that states the user is not old enough to drive will be logged.

Report a Bug
If you see a bug or any other issue with this page, please report it here.