Git Teamwork
Lesson 1 of 1
  1. 1
    So far, we’ve learned how to work on Git as a single user. Git offers a suite of collaboration tools to make working with others on a project easier. Imagine that you’re a science teacher, develo…
  2. 2
    Sally has created the remote repository, science-quizzes in the directory curriculum, which teachers on the school’s shared network have access to. In order to get your own replica of __sci…
  3. 3
    Nice work! We have a clone of Sally’s remote on our computer. One thing that Git does behind the scenes when you clone science-quizzes is give the remote address the name origin, so that you …
  4. 4
    After you cloned science-quizzes, you had to run off to teach a class. Now that you’re back at your computer, there’s a problem: what if, while you were teaching, Sally changed the __science-qu…
  5. 5
    Even though Sally’s new commits have been fetched to your local copy of the Git project, those commits are on the origin/master branch. Your local master branch has not been updated yet, so you c…
  6. 6
    Now that you’ve merged origin/master into your local master branch, you’re ready to contribute some work of your own. The workflow for Git collaborations typically follows this order: 1. Fetch and…
  7. 7
    Now it’s time to share our work with Sally. The command: git push origin your_branch_name will push your branch up to the remote, origin. From there, Sally can review your branch and merge you…
  8. 8
    Congratulations, you now know enough to start collaborating on Git projects! Let’s review. A remote* is a Git repository that lives outside your Git project folder. Remotes can live on the w…

What you'll create

Portfolio projects that showcase your new skills

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How you'll master it

Stress-test your knowledge with quizzes that help commit syntax to memory

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