reversed()

Takes in an iterator object, such as a list or string, and returns a reversed iterator object.

Syntax

reversed(iterator)

Example 1

Because the reversed() function returns an iterator object, in order to access the content, it is necessary to iterate over the object when printing:

counting = ["one", "two", "three"]
blast_off = reversed(counting)
for num in blast_off:
print(num, end=" ")
# Output: three two one

Example 2

To simply reverse an existing list rather than return an iterator object, Python has a list.reverse() method:

counting = ["one", "two", "three"]
blast_off = reversed(counting)
print(blast_off) # Output: <list_reverseiterator object at 0x7ff4f6a1dfa0>
counting.reverse()
print(counting) # Output: ['three', 'two', 'one']

Example 3

Because strings are also iterator objects, reversed() can also be used on strings.

new = reversed("stressed")
for letter in new:
print(letter, end="")
# Output: desserts
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